diecry:

The album cover drew mixed responses, especially from Capitol. “They sent photos of me from two years ago and were like, ‘Can you use this as the album cover?’” she says. But the singer held her ground: “It’s hard enough to be a woman making music at all, but I’m not going to start covering myself up just to seem more credible—I’m going to embrace my sexuality because I have every right to.”

diecry:

The album cover drew mixed responses, especially from Capitol. “They sent photos of me from two years ago and were like, ‘Can you use this as the album cover?’” she says. But the singer held her ground: “It’s hard enough to be a woman making music at all, but I’m not going to start covering myself up just to seem more credible—I’m going to embrace my sexuality because I have every right to.”

Reblogged from skinnyhipsandfragilelips

historical-nonfiction:

Welcome to Derinkuyu, an underground city that once housed up to 20,000 people. In the Cappadocia region, famous for its cave dwellings and underground villages, Derinkuyu stands out for sheer size and complexity. Locals began digging in the 500s BCE. The city consists of over 600 doors, each of which can be closed from the inside. Each floor could be closed off as well. And just to make attacking completely impossible, the entire city was deliberately built without any logic. Its maze-like layout makes navigating the city nightmarish for unfamiliar invaders.

Reblogged from blaqmercury